Posts Tagged construction

Getting Around in Chad

    Smooth pavement in Chad has been a cause for celebration in the past, when we would make our long travels back and forth between Mongo and Chad’s capital of N’Djamena. We would leave Mongo early in the morning, and by mid-afternoon, after about 380 km of bumpy, dusty, dirt roads, as our wheels touched the smooth asphalt in Masaguet, we would all start screaming for joy to finally be on smooth roads again. The last 120 km to the capital seemed like a breeze.
    Progress came more quickly over the next several years. During our last term in Chad, we were able to drive on 300 km of pavement followed by only 200 km of dirt roads the rest of the way to our village. Then, shortly before we left 3 years ago, we only had less than 100 km of dirt roads. Most memorable was our very last trip out of our village as we approached the big wadi called the Bang Bang. This wadi was the main “rainy season river” that would block travelers from crossing for much of rainy season, therefore locking us into our village area for the whole of rainy season. On our last trip across the Bang Bang, we were able to drive “over” it on the newly built bridge. We were so amazed that we had to stop on the bridge and take pictures to remember this moment, but it was also sad to think that we would never need to ask locals, eager to make a buck, to help push our vehicle through the rushing waters again.
    Art has now been back to Mongo, Chad 3 times since we all left, and he reports that the paved road now goes all the way to Mongo, and beyond. What should be included is that, even though this road is paved pretty much across the country, when it comes to the part of this road that goes through the larger villages including Mongo, the work has not yet even started.

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hospitals

Chad, AfricaThere are some hospitals in the capital, and one of the things that we liked about moving into Mongo many years ago was that there was also a hospital there. But as we became more familiar with these places, we realized that it was not a place that we would want to go to be treated. So the book, “Where There Is No Doctor” became a very important and well used book for our family’s health issues. continue reading>>

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gas stations

the old gas station in Chad, Africa When we first arrived in Chad over ten years ago, there were a few gas stations in the capital where we would fill up, and one of them never had gas. Most of the local people who drove cars or motorcycles went to little stands by the road. There were little tables, like this one pictured, with a few recycled alcohol bottles or jugs that they used for holding fuel.
In the village, we only had really one option for getting gas. There was a man who would sell it, usually by the barrel, and his son would filter the gas through an old tee-shirt as it went into our tank. This worked out well for the most part. continue reading>>

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market place

While we were last in Chad, the government was constructing a new site for the marketplace in Mongo.  They finished building all the structures for the boutiques and layed a nice walk area around the market.  So we were surprised that, as the months went on, the vendors were still selling at the old market.  This went on for a couple of years with the old market still busy as ever and the new place more of a ghost town.  So it’s good to finally hear that very recently some of the vendors are starting to move over to the new site.  There are still many at the old market, but maybe at this pace, next year will have the new site crawling with business and the old one a ghost town.

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