Posts Tagged meal

Chad, Africa: What They Eat

Some Chadians transporting their goats in the most loving way possible.

Some Chadians transporting their goats in the most loving way possible.

Chad, Africa is a third world country. In fact, Chad is one of the poorest countries in the world. For this reason, Chadians are forced to live a lifestyle quite different from your average suburban household. One example is in what they eat.

On the average day, Chadians mostly eat a pasty substance called ‘boule’. It consists of a grain called millet, which is their staple crop. Boule, served in a dome form, is eaten with the hands, and dipped in different sauces before it is consumed. Why boule? It’s cheap. That’s the best reason I can come up with, because, honestly, it doesn’t taste so good… at all. Chadians almost always eat as a group, from the same platter. It is part of their culture. Even though eating from the same plate is – we can’t deny – unsanitary,  the average Chadians does it without exception.

Now, on special occasions, or if it’s affordable, Chadians often eat common dishes such as goat meat (which the Aviles kids love). The goat meat there is not what you’d find in the States or Europe either. That’s because it is always tough. The goats run around all they want. It isn’t like they are kept in some cage and taught to just eat all day. The same goes for chicken, which is not consumed as much as goat. Chadians like their meat spicy, so they often use different sauces, or a crushed red pepper mixed with salt. Another food is rice, but rice isn’t eaten even close to as much as millet is. Chadians get most of their other food, such as vegetables, from the outdoor market.

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Rainy Season

Rainy season in Chad, AfricaBetter late than never. Rainy season is a very important time of year for everyone in Chad. So many people are sustenance farmers that if the rains don’t come, the people have nothing to eat for the next year. Millet, which is their main staple, is brought in from neighboring countries at very high prices which not many can afford enough of.
But thankfully we received news that August has brought some good rains. It’s over a month late, but it’s better late than never. Another thing to consider with this is if there will be enough rain at the end of the season to ripen the crop for harvest come November-January.

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hungry?

Thanks to the French military and UN presence, there is a growing variety of food available in the capital of Chad. We took advantage of that often when we were in the capital. But if you really wanted to eat the way most Chadians do, you would probably get tired of their food after one day. That is because they eat what they call boule for most of their meals. It is made of boiled ground millet. (You can buy millet seed in the States, usually for bird food.) It’s boiled into a consistency similar to that of play-doe, but the part that makes it nice most of the time is the sauce that you dip it into. This is usually made of a leafy sauce spiced up to be quite tasty… most of the time. A platter for the boule for everyone to share off of, and a bowl for the sauce for everyone to dip into. No table and chairs, and best of all, apart from the one platter and bowl, no dishes to clean up afterwards. Bon apetit!

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